March 7, 2017

Melbourne room acoustic workshop

Would you like to know how your room performs acoustically? Would you like to know how to measure your room and more importantly, how to understand what the results mean?

We're offering the chance to learn about room acoustics in the room that matters most - yours. We're offering this with a twist. In a typical room analysis session, we work one on one. To keep it affordable, we limit the time and cut to the chase, moving to the interpretation and what to do about it. You don't get the chance to learn how to take the measurements and how to interpret them.

Hosts wanted


The best place to start is as a host. As a host you will learn about your room and come away with clear direction specific to your room, system and aspirations. Since all participants pay to enter, you pay less and you're getting more time. It also promises to be an enjoyable social event in the tradition of the Aussie audio GTG (get together) BBQ.

You need:
  • an audio system that you enjoy with either music, movies or both
  • enough space for 5 participants to attend
  • availability from 10 am - 5 pm

 

Participants wanted


As a participant you get to learn about room acoustics in a system and room that is different to your own. If you've already used our room analysis service, then you may like to learn more about how it's done, as this involves content we don't normally cover. The best way to learn and retain what you've learnt is with a hands on approach. Every system and room is different.

If you would like to attend, either as a host or participant, register your expression of interest via our contact form.

February 24, 2017

PSE ultra passive crossover

Introducing the Ultra crossover:

 



One of our PSE horn customers requested an ultra high end version of the passive crossover. These parts are in cost-no-object territory and they are among the best available. Where possible we used Mundorf Supreme Silver Gold and Oil caps. All cable runs are beneath the board, which serves not only to avoid visual clutter but also to assist with holding the caps in place. All caps are secured with adhesive rather than cable ties. Inductors are Mundorf foil types.

January 16, 2017

When your IR repeater is slow and unresponsive

So you've decided to finally get your act together and make your AV system spouse friendly. That might mean hiding all your audio equipment inside an entertainment unit without having to open the doors for your remote to work. Perhaps you've even installed it all in a dedicated cabinet completely hidden from view. You need an IR repeater.




Above: a wireless IR repeater.

The concept is simple. A receiver senses the signal from your remotes and then relays them to your equipment via a number of emitters attached to each device. Some relay the signal wirelessly, others via included cable or though existing HDMI or ethernet network cable. Integra AVRs also allow you to direct wire the signal.

Sounds so simple, what could go wrong?! If you use Foxtel, you should be aware that not all IR repeaters are compatible, so check before you buy. Another potential problem is interference from devices near the IR receiver. When this occurs, you'll notice that the response is very slow. You may have to press a button multiple times and it appears to work very slowly, very hit and miss.

To test if this is your problem try this:

1. Move the IR sensor away from all other devices

2. Aim the remote at the sensor at close range (say 100mm away) - aim carefully

3. Does it work now? If so, gradually move the unit closer to its intended position. You may find that the problem comes back as it gets close to other devices.

4. Is there an alternative position that avoids the problem?

5. The sensor may require shielding. A quick experiment is to line it with aluminium foil as shown below.





We know, it's not pretty! We suggest this not as a long term solution but as part of your troubleshooting process. If this solves your problem, then you know you have an interference issue. If you have DIY inclinations then you might consider a longer term mod, like installing the IR receiver in a DIY metal box or you might come up with some simple DIY shielding. Many at this point would simply take the device back.